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Deploying Rails: Automate, Deploy, Scale, Maintain, and Sleep at Night (The Facets of Ruby)

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Ruby on Rails has taken the web application development world by storm. Those of us who have been writing web apps for a few years remember the good ol’ days when the leading contenders for web programming languages were PHP and Java, with Perl, Smalltalk, and even C++ as fringe choices. Either PHP or Java could get the job done, but millions of lines of legacy code attest to the difficulty of using either of those languages to deliver solid web applications that are easy to evolve.

But Ruby on Rails changed all that. Now thousands of developers around the world are writing and delivering high-quality web applications on a regular basis. Lots of people are programming in Ruby. And there are plenty of books, screencasts, and tutorials for almost every aspect of bringing a Rails application into being.

We say “almost every aspect” because there’s one crucial area in which Rails applications are not necessarily a joy; that area is deployment. The most elegant Rails application can be crippled by runtime environment issues that make adding new servers an adventure, unexpected downtime a regularity, scaling a difficult task, and frustration a constant. Good tools do exist for deploying, running, monitoring, and measuring Rails applications, but pulling them together into a coherent whole is no small effort.

In a sense, we as Rails developers are spoiled. Since Rails has such excellent conventions and practices, we expect deploying and running a Rails application to be a similarly smooth and easy path. And while there are a few standard components for which most Rails developers will reach when rolling out a new application, there are still plenty of choices to make and decisions that can affect an application’s stability.
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The Definitive Guide to MySQL 5, Third Edition
The Definitive Guide to MySQL 5, Third Edition
This edition is an extensive revision of the second edition. Most of the changes relate to changes in the
MySQL server from version 4.1 to version 5.0. But there is also much that is new in areas surrounding
MySQL, including new programming interfaces (e.g., mysqli in PHP 5) and new administrative tools.
The most important new
...
Agile Web Development with Rails, Third Edition
Agile Web Development with Rails, Third Edition
You want to write professional-grade applications: Rails is a full-stack, open-source web framework, with integrated support for unit, functional, and integration testing. It enforces good design principles, consistency of code across your team (and across your organization), and proper release management.

But Rails is more than a set of best...

Web Development Recipes
Web Development Recipes
It’s no longer enough to know how to wrangle HTML, CSS, and a bit of Java- Script. Today’s web developer needs to know how to write testable code, build interactive interfaces, integrate with other services, and sometimes even do some server configuration, or at least a little bit of backend work. This...

SQL for Microsoft Access (Wordware Applications Library)
SQL for Microsoft Access (Wordware Applications Library)
To get the most out of a book, it is usually a good idea to discover
immediately what the authors plan to discuss in the book,
how they plan to present the material, and how much knowledge
of the subject the reader needs to have. So, to put things
in a nutshell, this is a book about basic SQL and how to build
SQL database
...
Pragmatic Version Control Using Git (Pragmatic Starter Kit)
Pragmatic Version Control Using Git (Pragmatic Starter Kit)
Whether you're making the switch from a traditional centralized version control system or are a new programmer just getting started, this book prepares you to start using Git in your everyday programming.

Pragmatic Version Control Using Git starts with an overview of version control systems, and shows how being distributed enables...

The Rails View: Create a Beautiful and Maintainable User Experience
The Rails View: Create a Beautiful and Maintainable User Experience
In 2004, Rails was born and the web discovered the MVC (model-viewcontroller) pattern in earnest, which brought a whole new level of productivity and fun to a world of developers and designers.

You’ll find no end of books that provide a firm foundation for writing controllers and models
...
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