Home | Amazing | Today | Tags | Publishers | Years | Account | Search 
Agile Software Development: Evaluating The Methods For Your Organization

Buy
Are you interested in using an Agile method for developing software? Or
are others lobbying you to approve the use of one? Or is your interest more
casual; perhaps you are merely wondering if an Agile method is worth considering?
Whichever is the case, this book is for you.

I come from the “disciplined process” world. After 13 years at the Software
Engineering Institute (SEI) and a few years running ASK Process, Inc.,
I received a query from a prospect who asked about Extreme Programming
(XP). To answer that query, I began researching XP, and that turned into
research into the Agile methods in general. So began my foray into the Agile
world.

The more research I did, the more I became intrigued with the Agile
methods. Far from being a license to hack (as I, like many of my “disciplined
process” colleagues believed), these methods have some interesting practices
that make a whole lot of sense to me. There are ways in which they are
not so very different from the disciplined methods I have come to respect so
much, like the Capability Maturity Model (CMM)® and the Team Software
ProcessSM (TSP)SM. But there are other ways in which they are dramatically
different — different in ways that solve problems that are so common in
software organizations. I told myself, “There is a lot that we can learn from
the Agile methods!”

The Agile and the disciplined process communities have not gotten along
well. You are likely to hear process-philes disparaging the Agile methods. At
the same time, you are likely to hear the Agilists crying about the terrors of
disciplined process. The truth, of course, is somewhere between those two
extremes. Disciplined processes are good and necessary, as long as they do
what processes should do: support the work of professionals and make them
more effective. And agility — the ability to move quickly and adapt to
changing realities while maintaining one’s balance — is also critical, as long
as it remains focused on meeting the customer’s needs in a way that also
meets the needs of the development organization.
(HTML tags aren't allowed.)

Make Projects: Small Form Factor PCs
Make Projects: Small Form Factor PCs
Shoebox sized and smaller, small form factor PCs can pack as much computing muscle as anything from a PDA to a full-sized desktop computer. They consume less power, have few or no moving parts, and are very quiet. Whether you plan to use one as a standalone PC or want to embed it in your next hacking project, a small form factor PC may be the next...
Building iPhone and iPad Electronic Projects: Real-World Arduino, Sensor, and Bluetooth Low Energy Apps in techBASIC
Building iPhone and iPad Electronic Projects: Real-World Arduino, Sensor, and Bluetooth Low Energy Apps in techBASIC

Why simply play music or go online when you can use your iPhone or iPad for some really fun projects, such as building a metal detector, hacking a radio control truck, or tracking a model rocket in flight? Learn how to build these and other cool things by using iOS device sensors and inexpensive hardware such as Arduino and a...

Standard Handbook of Electronic Engineering, Fifth Edition with CD-ROM
Standard Handbook of Electronic Engineering, Fifth Edition with CD-ROM

The Standard Handbook of Electronics Engineering has defined its field for over thirty years. Spun off in the 1960’s from Fink’s Standard Handbook of Electrical Engineering, the Christiansen book has seen its markets grow rapidly, as electronic engineering and microelectronics became the growth engine of digital computing. The EE...


Google Web Toolkit for Ajax
Google Web Toolkit for Ajax

The Google Web Toolkit (GWT) is a nifty framework that Java programmers can use to create Ajax applications. The GWT allows you to create an Ajax application in your favorite IDE, such as IntelliJ IDEA or Eclipse, using paradigms and mechanisms similar to programming a Java Swing application. After you code the application in...

iPod & iTunes: The Missing Manual, Fourth Edition
iPod & iTunes: The Missing Manual, Fourth Edition

When Apple introduced the iPod in 2001, CEO Steve Jobs declared, "listening to music will never be the same again." He was right on the money. The iPod grabbed attention right away, and by the end of 2005, more than 41 million of them had sold. iPod is the dominant digital music player on the market, and for the first...

Statistical Models for Data Analysis (Studies in Classification, Data Analysis, and Knowledge Organization)
Statistical Models for Data Analysis (Studies in Classification, Data Analysis, and Knowledge Organization)

The papers in this book cover issues related to the development of novel statistical models for the analysis of data. They offer solutions for relevant problems in statistical data analysis and contain the explicit derivation of the proposed models as well as their implementation. The book assembles the selected and refereed proceedings of...

©2019 LearnIT (support@pdfchm.net) - Privacy Policy