Home | Amazing | Today | Tags | Publishers | Years | Account | Search 
Database Concepts (6th Edition)

Buy
Colin Johnson is a production supervisor for a small manufacturer in Seattle. Several years ago, Colin wanted to build a database to keep track of components in product packages. At the time, he was using a spreadsheet to perform this task, but he could not get the reports he needed from the spreadsheet. Colin had heard about Microsoft Access, and he tried to use it to solve his problem. After several days of frustration, he bought several popular Microsoft Access books and attempted to learn from them. Ultimately, he gave up and hired a consultant who built an application that more or less met his needs.

Colin was a successful businessperson who was highly motivated to achieve his goals. A seasoned Windows user, he had been able to teach himself how to use Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint, and a number of production-oriented application packages. He was flummoxed at his inability to use Microsoft Access to solve his problem. “I’m sure I could do it, but I just don’t have any more time to invest,” he thought. This story is especially remarkable because it has occurred tens of thousands of times over the past decade, to many other people.

Microsoft, Oracle, IBM, and other database management system (DBMS) vendors are aware of such scenarios and have invested millions of dollars in creating better graphical interfaces, hundreds of multipanel wizards, and many sample applications. Unfortunately, such efforts treat the symptoms and not the root of the problem. In fact, most users have no clear idea what the wizards are doing on their behalf. As soon as these users require changes to database structure or to components such as forms and queries, they drown in a sea of complexity for which they are unprepared. With little understanding of the underlying fundamentals, these users grab at any straw that appears to lead in the direction they want. The consequence is poorly designed databases and applications that fail to meet the users’ requirements.

Why can people like Colin learn to use a word processor or a spreadsheet product yet fail when trying to learn to use a DBMS product? First, the underlying database concepts are unnatural to most people. Whereas everyone knows what paragraphs and margins are, no one knows what a relation is. Second, it seems as though using a DBMS product ought to be easier than it is. “All I want to do is keep track of something. Why is it so hard?” people ask. Without knowledge of the relational model, breaking a sales invoice into five separate tables before storing the data is mystifying to business users.

This book is intended to help people like Colin understand, create, and use databases in a DBMS product, whether they are individuals who found this book in a bookstore or students using this book as their textbook in a class.
(HTML tags aren't allowed.)

A Software Engineer Learns HTML5, JavaScript and jQuery
A Software Engineer Learns HTML5, JavaScript and jQuery
New revision is now available. Fully revised and re-edited.


HTML5 web applications are now capable of matching or exceeding the scale and sophistication of desktop applications, but with the unique advantage of running natively inside the web browsers on billions of desktop computers, phones,
...
Windows PowerShell Best Practices
Windows PowerShell Best Practices

Expert recommendations, pragmatically applied.

Automate system administration using Windows PowerShell best practices—and optimize your operational efficiency. With this practical guide, Windows PowerShell expert and instructor Ed Wilson delivers field-tested tips, real-world examples, and candid advice culled from...

Jumping into C++
Jumping into C++
Want to learn to code? Want to learn C++? Struggling to follow your lecturer or books and tutorials written for experts? You're not alone. As a professional C++ developer and former Harvard teaching fellow, I know what you need to know to be a great C++ programmer, and I know how to teach it, one step at a time. I know where people...

Blockchain Basics: A Non-Technical Introduction in 25 Steps
Blockchain Basics: A Non-Technical Introduction in 25 Steps

In 25 concise steps, you will learn the basics of blockchain technology. No mathematical formulas, program code, or computer science jargon are used. No previous knowledge in computer science, mathematics, programming, or cryptography is required. Terminology is explained through pictures, analogies, and metaphors.

This book...

Teach Yourself VISUALLY HTML5
Teach Yourself VISUALLY HTML5
Make mark-up language more manageable with this visual guide

HTML5 is the next-generation of web standard mark-up language, and among other things, it offers amazing new avenues for incorporating multimedia into your sites. What easier way to master all of HTML5's new bells and whistles than with a guide that shows you,...

Learning PowerShell
Learning PowerShell

Learning PowerShell is a custom-built, handcrafted, painstakingly curated book designed to get you from total PowerShell newbie to confident PowerShell user in as little as four weeks. This book assumes no prior knowledge, perfect for non-developers and Gui addicts who recognize that PowerShell is the future but need a good bit of handholding...

©2019 LearnIT (support@pdfchm.net) - Privacy Policy