Home | Amazing | Today | Tags | Publishers | Years | Account | Search 
Gender in International Relations

Buy
As a scholar and teacher of international relations, I have frequently asked myself the following questions: Why are there so few women in my discipline? If I teach the field as it is conventionally defined, why are there so few readings by women to assign to my students? Why is the subject matter of my discipline so distant from women's lived experiences? Why have women been conspicuous only by their absence in the worlds of diplomacy and military and foreign policy-making?

I began to think about writing this book as an attempt to answer these questions. Having spent my childhood in London during World War II and my adolescence in New York as part of a United Nations' family, international affairs were an important part of my early life. But, as one of only three female graduate students in my year in Yale University's International Relations Program in the early 1960s, I began to notice that the academic discipline that I had chosen, in part because of these formative experiences, was not one that attracted many women. Admittedly, when I returned to graduate studies in the 1970s, the number of women entering the field had grown: while I felt less isolated, I observed that women scholars and teachers of international relations were clustered in areas such as international political economy, development studies, and international political theory. I still wondered why so few women chose national and international security studies, the privileged core of the field.

My own research has been in areas such as Third World development, North-South relations, and peace studies-- areas that were far  from the mainstream of international politics in the early 1980s when I began my academic career. Like many women in internationalrelations, I did not choose to specialize in security-linked war and peace studies, usually associated with great power relations and power politics, areas central to the subject matter of the classical discipline.

As a teacher of international relations, however, I have, of necessity, familiarized myself with what some in my field would call the "important" issues of war and peace, generally defined as national security studies. But, as only one of three women out of a total of about sixty students who participated in a course on nuclear strategy at M.I.T. in the early 1980s, my contention that this is an area of international relations not heavily populated by women was strongly reinforced. Trying to familiarize myself with the arcane and esoteric language of nuclear strategy, I remembered with some sympathy how, as an undergraduate history major, I had avoided details of war-fighting strategies and weapons development.

About the Author

J. Ann Tickner is professor of international relations at the University of Southern California.



 

(HTML tags aren't allowed.)

Tweak It: Make What Matters to You Happen Every Day
Tweak It: Make What Matters to You Happen Every Day

As the demands of work grow more intense, personal life can get shoved to the side. But resolving the job-versus-life conflict doesn't require the kind of big, disruptive, scary transformation that so many time-management "experts" recommend. In TWEAK IT, Cali Williams Yost proves that a comfortable work+life fit can be achieved...

Business Applications and Computational Intelligence
Business Applications and Computational Intelligence
Computational intelligence has a long history of applications to business - expert systems have been used for decision support in management, neural networks and fuzzy logic have been used in process control, a variety of techniques have been used in forecasting, and data mining has become a core component of customer relationship management in...
Applied Bioinformatics: An Introduction
Applied Bioinformatics: An Introduction

Confused by cryptic computer programs, algorithms and formulae?

In this book, anyone who can operate a PC, standard software and the Internet will learn to understand the biological basis of bioinformatics of the existence as well as the source and availability of bioinformatics software how to apply these tools and interpret results...


Getting Started with SAS Profitability Management 1.3
Getting Started with SAS Profitability Management 1.3
This document contains step-by-step instructions for defining a SAS Profitability Management model using the sample data sets provided with the product. The instructions include those for defining and viewing reports based on the model, and for generating and viewing the resulting OLAP cube. The document provides a detailed description of, as well...
Chronic Pain (Pain Management)
Chronic Pain (Pain Management)

Providing a general approach to the understanding and management of all forms of chronic  pain, this book offers a clear and reader-friendly format that clarifies procedures in the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of the most common chronic non-cancer pain entities.  Describing various types of intractable non-cancer pain,...

Algorithms: Design Techniques and Analysis (Lecture Notes Series on Computing, Vol 7)
Algorithms: Design Techniques and Analysis (Lecture Notes Series on Computing, Vol 7)
The most general intuitive idea of an algorithm * is a procedure that consists of a finite set of instructions which, given an input from some set of possible inputs, enables us to obtain an output if such an output exists or else obtain nothing at all if there is no output for that particular input through a systematic execution of the...
©2018 LearnIT (support@pdfchm.net) - Privacy Policy